International Studies & Programs

Brown Bag Schedule

Several times each semester, at least monthly, the Center for European, Russian and Eurasian Studies hosts luncheon discussions of important topics and emerging research by CERES core faculty members and visiting scholars.


The Politics and Prospects of Agricultural Reform in Kazakhstan

Speaker:  Martha Olcott, Visiting Professor, James Madison College, Michigan State University

Tuesday, May 16, noon

International Center, Room 305


An Update on the Refugee/Migration Challenges of Greece and Turkey

Speaker:  Sophia Koufopoulou, Department of Sociology. Michigan State University

Friday, April 28, noon

International Center, Room 302


Survivor-Historians and the Emergence of Holocaust Studies

Speaker:  Lynn L Wolff, PhD, Assistant Professor of German
Department of Linguistics, Germanic, Slavic, Asian, and African Languages, Michigan State University

Thurssday, April 27, noon

International Center, Room 302

H.G. Adler was a pioneer in the field of Holocaust studies but was nearly forgotten as a prolific author of poetry and prose. His work helped build a survivor’s narrative of the Theresienstadt “ghetto,” Auschwitz, and other Nazi concentration camps. This discussion will highlight how Adler’s works and correspondence directly engage with the ethical, aesthetic, and epistemological challenges of simultaneously writing history and literature ‘after Auschwitz.’


Akarturk Karahan, Visiting Scholar, Ankara University

Wednsday, April 26, noon

International Center, Room 302

11th Century Turkic Homelands from Kashgari’s Perspective

The Divanu Lugāti’t-Türk of Mahmud Kashgarî gives valuable information on Turkic tribes throughout the 11th century. The work of Kashgari is a unique source for Turcology in many aspects. In his work, Kashgari states that, "I have travelled throughout their cities and steppes, and have learned their dialects and their rhymes; those of the Turks, the Turkman-Oghuz, the Chigil, the Yagma, and the Qirqiz.” The discussion will focus on his work of drawing borders of the 11th century Turkic world.


Dr. Emine Evered

Thursday, March 30, noon

International Center, Room 302

Yeşilay and Turkey’s Past and Present Politics of Temperance, Prohibition, and Alcohol Regulation

The Turkish temperance society Yeşilay (the Green Crescent) emerged in early 20th century and focused on anti-addiction efforts, public health, and morality. This presentation examines its establishment and agenda while interrogating Turkey’s early histories of temperance. In doing so, it also provides a foundation for understanding Yeşilay’s contemporary role in Turkish politics and society. Moreover, amid twenty-first century state initiatives—like the increased regulation of alcohol, its prominence and influence has heightened.


Michael Alberts

Friday, March 24, noon

International Center, Room 302

Reflections of an MSU Russian Studies Alumnus on His 1967 Visit to the Soviet Union


Dr. Elizabeth Mittman

Associate Professor of German

Wednesday, February 22, noon

International Center, Room 302

Drawing Towards Autobiography


Dr. Joseph Francese

Professor of  Romance And Classical Studies

Friday, January 27, noon

International Center, Room 302

The Death Penalty in a novel by Leonardo Sciascia

 


Dr. Kyle Evered & Dr. Emine Ö. Evered

Associate Professor of Geography

Friday, January 13, noon

International Center, Room 302

Ideology & the Therapeutic Landscape: Public Health & the Curative Waters of Kemalism

 


Russia vs. the West: Concepts of Controversy in the Russian Public Sphere

Tuesday, November 15th, 4:00 PM
International Center, Room 303

Dr. Julia Balashova, Professor of Journalism and Mass Communications, Saint Petersburg State University, Russia

Current relations with the West have a historical basis in the ideology, and stereotypes, of the Cold War. The relationship between Russia and the Western World is one of the fundamental ques-tions of Russian social thought. The Russian pub-lic sphere presents different ideological positions on cooperation with the West, and primarily the United States. Professor Balashova will be un-packing these ideologies using a historical ap-proach.


Reflections on Russia as a "Lonely Power"

Tuesday, October 4, 12:00 p.m. - 1:30 p.m.
Dr. Lilia Shevtsova, Moscow
James Madison College Library, Third Floor of Case Hall

Dr. Shevtsova received her BA and MA from Moscow State Institute of International Relations and her PhD in political science in 1976 from the Academy of Social Sciences of the Central Committee of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union. She has served in various academic and public intellectual posts, including a long and influential position as Senior Associate with the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace. Her publications include: "Lonely Power: Why Russia has Failed to Become the West and the West is Weary of Russia" (2010).